Diane Simpson

Feb. 8, 2013 - March 23, 2013

Main Gallery

View

Diane Simpson

Tunic (folded)
2012
Gatorfoam board, spunbond polyester, and crayon
34 x 72 x 36 inches

Diane Simpson

Vest (scalloped)
2010
copper, linoleum, steel base, wood, and enamel
56 x 22 x 14 inches

Diane Simpson

Collar / Bib (sections)
2012
Light density fiberboard (LDF), enamel, linen canvas, crayon, and colored pencil
25 x 32 x 9 inches

Diane Simpson

Neckline (extended)
2011
Light density fiberboard (LDF), aluminum, enamel, and colored pencil
85 x 50 x 14 inches

Diane Simpson

Collar (connect the dots)
2012
MDF, linen canvas, enamel, ink, and basswood
48 1/2 x 28 x 13 1/2 inches

Diane Simpson

Yoke
2012
MDF, enamel, oil stain, crayon, and aluminum
64 x 20 x 16 inches

Diane Simpson

Collar (on altered table)
2010
wood table, MDF, and enamel
34 x 25 x 12 inches

Diane Simpson

Collar (fluted)
2011
archival cardboard and crayon
24 x 23 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches

Diane Simpson

Cape (buttressed)
2011
MDF, oil stain, acrylic paint, and colored pencil
27 x 24 1/2 x 7 inches (sculpture);
18 1/2 x 36 1/2 x 15 inches (base)

Diane Simpson

Cape (SL)
2011
Gatorfoam board, spunbond polyester, and crayon
17 x 50 x 11 1/2 inches

Diane Simpson

Cuffs
2012
Wooden plant stand, enamel, MDF, and embossed paper
48 1/2 x 18 1/2 x 12 inches

Diane Simpson

Study for Tunic (folded)
2012
MDF, colored pencil, ink, archival cardboard, and enamel
40 x 38 x 3 inches

Diane Simpson

Drawing for Collar (on altered table)
2010
graphite on two sheets of vellum graph paper with collage
21 1/2 x 24 inches

Diane Simpson

Drawing for Cape (SL)
2011
graphite on two sheets of vellum graph paper with collage
19 3/4 x 18 1/2 inches

Diane Simpson

Drawings for Collars and Vest with Stand
2010
graphite on vellum graph paper with collage
15 x 21 inches

Diane Simpson

Drawing for Cape (buttressed) and Yoke
2011
graphite on vellum graph paper
18 x 20 1/2 inches

Diane Simpson

Drawing for Tunic (folded)
2012
graphite on vellum graph paper
18 x 22 3/4 inches

Installation view

Press Release

Corbett vs. Dempsey is very pleased to present its first solo exhibition of new sculpture and drawings by Diane Simpson. Since her earliest shows at Artemisia and the Phyllis Kind Gallery in the late 1970s, Simpson has been a major force in Chicago sculpture. Indeed, Simpson straddles several generations in Chicago art; she attended the School of the Art Institute in the mid 1950s, received her MFA there in 1971, where she was friends with Imagist artists including Christina Ramberg and Ray Yoshida, and she has maintained deep connections with the abstract conceptual artists of the 1980s, including Richard Rezac and Julia Fish.

Exploring a liminal zone between abstraction and figuration, her sculpture starts with intensive studies in fashion, extracting the human (left as an insinuation) and focusing on the architecture of the attire, its inherent tensions and relaxations, out of which Simpson extrapolates entirely original forms. A collar, a cuff, a hem – each part of a piece of clothing is fodder for formal play, deconstruction and reconstruction. An intense and detail-fixated craftswoman, firmly in the same Windy City tradition as H.C. Westermann, she has worked in diverse materials, including cardboard, MDF, wood, fabric, paper, aluminum, and vintage linoleum, all with a meticulous finish and an aggressive sense of design.

Early in her career, Simpson introduced a way of making 3-D work that translated from drawings, concentrating on the 45-degree angles that helped define a certain kind of perspective. She continues this investigation with an important new piece, based on the same set of calculations, as well as unveiling new freestanding, wall hanging, and shelf-based works. Along with these new sculptures, Corbett vs. Dempsey presents several new drawings, executed on graph paper, which stand both as studies for the sculptures and fully-realized, independent works on paper.

Simpson was the subject of a retrospective, Sculpture + Drawings, 1978-2009 , at the Chicago Cultural Center (2009). A full-color, 48-page catalog, with essays by John Corbett and Jason Foumberg, accompanies the exhibition.