William Weege Peace is Patriotic

June 2, 2017 - July 8, 2017

Main Gallery

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Installation View

William Weege

Crude Oil Waste pn the River Rye
1969
serigraph-lithograph on paper
33 x 24 inches

Installation View

Installation View

William Weege

Next Weeks T.V. Guide
1968
serigraph-lithograph on paper
23 3/4 x 32 3/4 inches

Installation View

Installation View


William Weege


Law & Order
1968
seriagraph-lithograph on paper
58 1/2 x 90 inches

Installation View

William Weege

He...in Chicago
1973
serigraph with sewn thread and dyed paper
29 1/2 x 41 inches

Installation View

William Weege

Nixon Makes it Crystal Clean
1969
serigraph-lithograph on paper, nine panels
20 1/4 x 20 1/4 inches (each)

Installation View

William Weege

Join Your Chamber of Commerce, Hickel Did
1969
serigraph-lithograph on paper
22 x 33 inches

William Weege

Pencils for Blind Men
1971
serigraph on paper
23 3/4 x 15 1/2 inches

William Weege

Next Weeks T.V. Guide
1968
serigraph on paper
23 3/4 x 32 3/4 inches

Installation View

William Weege

Would’st Thou Have Daley For Thy King?
1968
serigraph-lithograph on paper
24 x 32 3/4 inches

Installation View

Installation View

William Weege

...Home Home On The Range...
1971
serigraph with flocking on paper
36 3/4 x 26 1/2 inches

William Weege

How To Make A Star!
1971
serigraph with flocking on paper
39 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches

Installation View

Installation View

William Weege

Untitled
1971
serigraph with flocking on paper
40 x 28 inches

William Weege

Only a Billion More, Smile
1969
serigraph-lithograph on paper
33 x 22 1/4 inches

Installation View

Installation View

William Weege

Yes, Virginia Happiness is a Warm Gun!
1969
serigraph-lithograph on paper
24 x 32 3/4 inches

William Weege

To Eddie the Next Major
1969
serigraph-lithograph on paper
22 x 32 3/4 inches

Installation View

Installation View

Installation View

William Weege

I’ve Got A Better Idea
1968
serigraph-lithograph on paper
24 x 32 3/4 inches

Installation View

Installation View

Installation View

Press Release

Opening reception: Friday, June 2, 6 – 8pm

It is with great early-summer pleasure that Corbett vs. Dempsey celebrates the 50th anniversary of the political print portfolio Peace is Patriotic with an exhibition of vintage work by its creator, William Weege.  This is the artist’s first exhibition with the gallery and also his first presentation in Chicago after a long hiatus.

William Weege (b. 1935) is a legendary figure in American printmaking.  He taught at University of Wisconsin, Madison, from 1971 to 1998, during which time he founded the Jones Road Print Shop and Stable of Barneveld, Wisconsin, where he collaborated with many important artists, most extensively Alan Shields and Sam Gilliam (the latter of whom he continues to work with today); in 1987, Weege went on to found Tandem Press.  Weege was responsible for bringing photographic methods into printmaking at UW, and at the time starting in the mid-’60s he was very active making collage-based prints, most of them of a bold and provocative political nature, often using highly experimental means.  The best known of these was a 25-piece portfolio titled Peace is Patriotic , from 1967, which utilized a range of different papers and combinations of serigraphy and offset printing.  At the time, eight images from the portfolio were licensed by a poster company, which ultimately disseminated them as posters to all corners of the American anti-war, underground, and counterculture; any good hippy household had one of them on its wall.  Comprised of Dada-like collages, incorporating text and images from popular culture, some of it graphically sexual or violent or medical, the portfolio included one print titled “Impeach Johnson,” which Weege repurposed three years later, its text altered to read “Impeach Nixon,” when he participated in the Smithsonian’s “Experimental Printmaking Workshop” at the notorious 1970 Venice Biennale.  Weege stood outside the American pavilion printing and handing out the piece.  In the late ’60s, Weege’s work was shown frequently in Chicago, including solo shows at Richard Gray Gallery, where he had a solo exhibition during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, and a presentation of his enormous 16-panel work “Long Live Life” in the same year at the Museum of Contemporary Art.  Weege’s political and social commentary printworks are bodacious and aggressive, deploying fluorescent colors and complex layers of photographic image – sometimes borrowed, sometimes shot – and involving unconventional techniques like flocking, glittering, and sewing.  In this, the first substantial roundup of works from 1967-1971, CvsD will show the Peace is Patriotic portfolio, along with two large multi-panel works, and a selection of other ambitious prints from the period.  In conjunction with the show, CvsD has produced a 124-page book exhaustively reproducing Weege’s social and political printworks up to 1978, as well as related collages and an illustrated conversation with the artist about the work.


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