Seymour Rosofsky: Xylophone Solo

July 27, 2012 - Sept. 1, 2012

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Seymour Rosofsky

Xylophone Player

1965

gouache and watercolor on paper

18 7/8 x 25 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

The Club
1971
watercolor and gouache on paper
23 7/8 x 27 7/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

The Smugglers
1964
ink and watercolor on paper
21 7/8 x 27 7/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Tea in Subway
1969
ink and watercolor on paper
19 x 24 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Elevator (Ascenseur)
1965
ink and watercolor on paper
20 x 26 1/4 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Two Boys in Ski Masks (Skaters)
1969
gouache on gray paper
22 x 31 3/4 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Two Women, Legs Akimbo
1978
pastel on scarlet paper
22 x 32 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Ski Mask People on Tags Hanging from Trees
1969
ink and gouache on paper
23 7/8 x 36 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Seated Man, Blue Background
n.d.
ink and gouache on paper
19 x 25 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Seated Figures with Porcupines
1966-67
gouache on tan paper
20 x 25 1/2 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Dwarf Figure Dancing
1960
pastel on paper
17 1/2 x 22 1/2 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Santa Claus and Turtle
1979
gouache and ink on paper
19 x 25 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Woman at Table, Children Underneath
1976
gouache, ink, and collage on tan paper
18 7/8 x 26 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Girl Jumping
mid 1960’s
watercolor and gouache on paper
22 x 30 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Moon Juggler (Raised Arm)
1976
gouache and charcoal pencil on tan paper
19 x 25 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Balloon Babies
c. 1970
pastel on pink paper
25 1/2 x 19 5/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Assassin
1979
pastel on tan paper
19 x 25 1/4 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Showdown
1965
gouache on paper
17 x 22 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Clay People
1974
gouache on paper
18 3/4 x 25 7/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Girls Jumping in Tilting House
1970
gouache on paper
19 5/8 x 24 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Couple Dancing in Living Room
1970
gouache and watercolor on paper
24 x 35 3/4 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Figure in Chairs with Ball and Two Poles
1969
pastel on tan paper
19 5/8 x 25 1/2 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Sceptered Man with Top
n.d.
pastel on gray paper
25 x 19 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Rifleman and Bar
1965
pastel on tan paper
20 x 25 3/4 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Alarm Figure in Aquarium
1966
ink, watercolor and pastel on paper
19 x 24 7/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Alarm Figures in Aquarium
1966
ink, watercolor and pastel on paper
19 x 24 7/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Children with Masks in the Zoo II
1969
charcoal, pastel and watercolor on paper
19 x 24 7/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Undiscovered Drawings Series (11)
1980
gouache on paper
23 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Undiscovered Drawings Series (7)
1976
gouache and watercolor on paper
23 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Undiscovered Drawings Series (4)
1976
gouache and watercolor on paper
23 1/4 x 29 1/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Undiscovered Drawings Series (13)
1980
gouache and watercolor on paper
23 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Undiscovered Drawings Series (6)
1976
gouache on paper
23 1/8 x 29 1/8 inches

Seymour Rosofsky

Man, Child, Birds
1969
watercolor on paper
18 x 23 3/4 inches

Installation view

Installation view

Press Release

For its second summer exhibition, Corbett vs. Dempsey is delighted to present Xylophone Solo, an exhibition of selected drawings by Seymour Rosofsky.

Rosofsky (1924-1981) is one of the key figures in twentieth century Chicago art.  Emerging in the late 1940s as part of the movement later dubbed the “Monster Roster,” alongside Leon Golub, Nancy Spero, June Leaf, and Dominick Di Meo, he initially painted grotesque, existentially angst-ridden figures, perfect little monsters.  By the early 1960s, Rosofsky had begun to develop a singularly fantastical style rooted in observational painting, creating unflinching masterworks like “Unemployment Agency” (which has hung in Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office) and “Homage to Spain, Thalydomide Children, Others” (in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago).  Rosofsky’s brilliance as a painter is widely recognized, but he was also a spectacular draughtsman with a particular interest in drawing as both a process and a medium.  Xylophone Solo spotlights fifteen great drawings – pencil, watercolor, pastel, charcoal – from the Rosofsky archives, some closely related to paintings, some imagined and executed entirely on their own.  The exhibition is accompanied by a 44-page catalog with reproductions of all these and more Rosofsky works on paper.