Konrad Klapheck The Squared Circle

Oct. 26, 2013 - Nov. 27, 2013

Main Gallery

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Konrad Klapheck

Drawing for “Jazzclub, 52nd Street”

2005

charcoal and red pencil on tracing paper

45 1/4 x 33 1/2 inches (115 x 85 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Drawing for “Loverman”

2009

charcoal and pencil on tracing paper

60 1/4 x 45 1/4 inches (153 x 115 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Drawing for “Nightclub”

2005

charcoal and pencil on tracing paper

59 x 37 inches (150 x 94 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Archie Shepp

2005

charcoal on Ingres paper

25 x 19 1/4 inches

Konrad Klapheck

Illinois Jacquet

2000

charcoal on Ingres paper

25 x 19 1/4 inches

Konrad Klapheck

Elvin Jones

2000

charcoal on Ingres paper

25 x 19 1/4 inches (63.3 x 48.6 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Rashied Ali

2000

charcoal on Ingres paper

25 x 19 1/4 inches (63.3 x 48.6 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Four Horns, One Mouth” I

2008

graphite and red pencil on paper

11 5/8 x 6 inches

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Four Horns, One Mouth” II

2008

graphite and red pencil on paper

11 1/2 x 6 inches (29.5 x 15 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Tomorrow is the Question” (Ornette Coleman)

2012

graphite and red pencil on paper

11 5/8 x 8 1/4 inches (27.7 x 21 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Galactic Blues” (Sun Ra)

2011

graphite and red pencil on paper

11 5/8 x 8 1/4 inches (27.7 x 21 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Solo” (Anthony Braxton)

2010

graphite and red pencil on folded paper

11 5/8 x 8 1/4 inches (27.7 x 21 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Initiation”

2008

charcoal on paper

11 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches (29.5 x 21 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “The Audience”

2008

graphite on paper

11 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches (29.5 x 21 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Jazzclub, 52nd Street”

2005

graphite on paper

11 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches (29.5 x 21 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Ballroom” I

2004

graphite and red pencil on paper

11 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches (29.5 x 21 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Sketch for “Ballroom” II

2004

graphite on paper

11 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches (29.5 x 21 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Ballroom

2010

engraving on paper

11 3/4 x 9 1/2 inches (plate); 21 x 15 1/2 inches (sheet) (53 x 39 cm)

Ed. of 30

Konrad Klapheck

Nude study for “Le ring I”

2000

charcoal on Ingres paper

25 x 19 1/4 inches (63.3 x 48.6 cm)

Konrad Klapheck

Le Ring

2010

engraving on ivory paper

13 1/2 x 10 3/4 inches (plate); 20 7/8 x 15 3/8 inches (sheet) (50 x 39 sm)

Ed. of 30

Konrad Klapheck

Round About Midnight

2010

engraving with black marker and white ink on white paper

10 1/2 x 8 inches (plate); 19 11/16 x 15 31/2 inches (sheet) (50 x 39 cm)

Ed. of 30



Press Release

Opening reception at the gallery on Saturday, October 26, from 5:00–8:00pm.

Since he emerged in the mid 1950s, Konrad Klapheck has been one of the legendary figures of European painting.  His early signature works were canvases of machines – sewing machines, watches, adding machines, motorcycyles, and most importantly typewriters.  Under Klapheck’s brush, a typewriter carried a great variety of connotations and associations.  Using his own patented perspectival system, he endowed them with personality, gender, a sense of menace or seductiveness.  In the ’60s and ’70s, these machines grew more complex and fantastic, but they retained their inherent objectness, their fetishistic quality as still images of metallic beasts.  Klapheck began to introduce figures into his work in the 1990s, and these, too, were unlike anything else in contemporary painting.  Narrative tableaux, often explicitly erotic and even disturbing, they made clear a side of the work that had always been latent in the anthropomorphic machines.  At the same time, the figurative works allowed Klapheck to return to two earlier loves:  boxing and jazz.  In the early ’50s, he had worked as a jazz journalist in Düsseldorf, and the new works included portraits of Charlie Parker, Billie Holiday, and Coleman Hawkins, as well as avant garde jazz figures including Archie Shepp, Anthony Braxton, and Ornette Coleman.

Klapheck’s work has been shown infrequently in the United States, most recently at Zwirner & Wirth (2007) in an exhibition curated by artist Christopher Williams.  In this, Klapheck’s first exhibition in Chicago, Corbett vs. Dempsey is proud to present a selection of jazz and boxing drawings and prints by one of the most profound and enigmatic artists of the last 60 years.