Dominick Di Meo Transfer

July 8, 2011 - Aug. 27, 2011

Main Gallery

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Dominick Di Meo


Study for a Monument with Cigar
1966
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
12" x 14"

Dominick Di Meo

Study for a Monument
1966
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
12" x 14"

Dominick Di Meo

Study for a Monument
1966
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
12" x 14"

Dominick Di Meo

Study for a Monument
1966
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
12" x 14"

Dominick Di Meo

Study for a Monument
1966
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
12" x 14"

Dominick Di Meo

Study for a Monument
1966
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
12" x 14"

Dominick Di Meo

Untitled (Collage Sea with Mans Face on Top)
1970
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
19" x 20"

Dominick Di Meo

Untitled (Eye, Ear, Hair on Black)
1967
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
19" x 20"

Dominick Di Meo

Hovering
1972
acrylic and synthetic polymer transfer on canvas
24" x 16"

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view

Installation view


Press Release

In his second solo exhibition at Corbett vs. Dempsey, Dominick Di Meo presents Transfer , a selection of canvases from the 1960s to today. One of the original Monster Roster artists, Di Meo first emerged in the 1950s, alongside Leon Golub, Nancy Spero, June Leaf, and Ted Halkin, working with tough, dark imagery and rough surfaces, often in relief. In 1964, Di Meo discovered a novel way of transferring ink from magazines into transparent synthetic polymer paint, allowing him to make paintings with imagery appropriated directly from a popular source. Among the startlingly original works that he made at this time is a suite of smaller canvases with piles of cropped and rearranged nude body parts. These were deemed pornographic by his former Chicago gallery and have not been exhibited until now. Di Meo’s explorations of transfer included various related techniques, such as stencil and collage. These paintings also incorporate disparate objects including postcards, playing cards, and rope. Since his CvsD debut in 2008, Di Meo has built a body of work using digital print technology, returning to postcard images of Bellini sculptures that he initially doctored in the 1960s, and reworking them into larger printed canvases


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